Deja View Inc. (Brick, NJ), the first company to introduce a wearable digital mini-camcorder with "after-the-fact" recording technology for the consumer market, announced it has contracted with Advent Electronics Pte Ltd. (Singapore) to build its products.

 

Terms of the strategic partnership were not disclosed, but according to Jeff Sobel, executive vice president of Deja View, Advent "is committed to deliver the products in the quantities we specified to meet our scheduled June launch."

 

The Model 100 is the first wearable digital camcorder. The tiny camera can be clipped to a pair of eyeglasses or on the bill of a hat. The recording device and digital storage are housed in a PDA-sized unit worn on a belt, waistband or fanny pack. The camera, which will sell for under $400, records 30 seconds of action that occurred before the user presses the record button.

 

"It was clear to us from the start that Deja View has great ideas, and we are proud to be selected as its manufacturing partner," said S.S. Lim, Advent's chief executive officer. "Deja View's first product, the Model 100, is truly innovative

 

Deja View was founded in 2002 to design, manufacture and market a complete line of wearable camera products based on its own patent-pending video camcorder technology.

 

Advent Electronics Pte Ltd was founded in June 1999 as a privately owned joint venture company with Lion Asiapac Ltd, a publicly listed company in Singapore and subsidiary of the Lion Group, a multi-billion dollar conglomerate in Malaysia. Its business is franchise distribution of electronic components in the South Asia Pacific region (including India), and providing value-added outsourcing services to U.S. and European customers. Such original equipment manufacturer (OEM) services include design, prototyping, PCB/PCBA, ISO9001/2 test capabilities and final product manufacturing.

 

www.adventelectronics.com

 

www.mydejaview.com

 

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